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22 de March, 2024

Is freezing eggs at 40 years old an option?

Our biological clock plays a crucial role when it comes to fertility, and that is why opting for egg freezing before the age of 35 is ideal for "pausing the clock." However, many women decide to preserve their fertility around the age of 38 to 40. Although it is technically possible, it is not the most recommended option from a clinical point of view. Dr. Jean Paul Sulaiman shares his perspective on the risks of freezing eggs at an older age.

What are the risks of freezing eggs at age 40?

The age at which you decide to freeze your eggs is decisive for the success of the procedure. Freezing them before age 35 increases the chances of a positive result. But as you approach 40, these odds decrease significantly. Additionally, the resulting embryos will likely need to be evaluated by Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) to verify that they do not present genetic abnormalities.

At Ingenes, we seek to offer the best option for our patients, even if it is less ideal, and we are prepared to proceed if this is your wish. However, few eggs, possibly of reduced quality, are likely to be obtained. Any embryos that form may need a PGD test.

The quality of the eggs is a crucial factor. As Dr. Sulaiman explains, the egg, by not regenerating, decreases in quality and quantity with age. The quality of the egg is essential for genetic exchange, and at ages between 38 and 40 years, there is a statistical increase in the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the embryo, such as Down Syndrome.

Disadvantages of freezing eggs at 40

  1. Ovarian reserve decreases significantly at age 40, which could result in a shortage of viable eggs after thawing or failure of fertilization and embryo development.
  2. Freezing eggs after age 35 may require at least three vitrification cycles to increase the chances of obtaining eggs of optimal quality for fertilization.
  3. At 40 years of age, the risk of genetic alterations in the embryo increases, which could require a Preimplantation Diagnosis (PGD) in case of successful fertilization to ensure the genetic health of the embryo.

If you are looking to minimize risks, consider the option of donating eggs and freezing embryos. Many women around 40 choose egg donation as an alternative.

Vitrification of eggs and embryos: A way to stop time?

Vitrification of eggs and embryos has become an increasingly common process. An In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) cycle generally produces several embryos to ensure that some are of sufficient quality to be transferred to the uterus and achieve a pregnancy.

Typically, one or two high-quality embryos are selected for transfer, and if there are more viable embryos, these are frozen for future use, either for subsequent IVF attempts or to plan more children in the future. Our biological clock plays a crucial role when it comes to fertility, and that is why opting for egg freezing before the age of 35 is ideal for "pausing the clock."

However, many women decide to preserve their fertility around the age of 38 to 40. Although it is technically possible, it is not the most recommended option from a clinical point of view. Dr. Jean Paul Sulaiman shares his perspective on the risks of freezing eggs at an older age.

What are the risks of freezing eggs at age 40?

The age at which you decide to freeze your eggs is decisive for the success of the procedure. Freezing them before age 35 increases the chances of a positive result. But as you approach 40, these odds decrease significantly. Additionally, the resulting embryos will likely need to be evaluated by Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) to verify that they do not present genetic abnormalities.

At Ingenes, we seek to offer the best option for our patients, even if it is less ideal, and we are prepared to proceed if this is your wish. However, few eggs, possibly of reduced quality, are likely to be obtained. Any embryos that form may need a PGD test. The quality of the eggs is a crucial factor. As Dr. Sulaiman explains, the egg, by not regenerating, decreases in quality and quantity with age. The quality of the egg is essential for genetic exchange, and at ages between 38 and 40 years, there is a statistical increase in the risk of chromosomal abnormalities in the embryo, such as Down Syndrome.

Disadvantages of freezing eggs at 40

  1. Ovarian reserve decreases significantly at age 40, which could result in a shortage of viable eggs after thawing or failure of fertilization and embryo development.
  2. Freezing eggs after age 35 may require at least three vitrification cycles to increase the chances of obtaining eggs of optimal quality for fertilization.
  3. At 40 years of age, the risk of genetic alterations in the embryo increases, which could require a Preimplantation Diagnosis (PGD) in case of successful fertilization to ensure the genetic health of the embryo.

If you are looking to minimize risks, consider the option of donating eggs and freezing embryos. Many women around 40 choose egg donation as an alternative.

Vitrification of eggs and embryos: A way to stop time?

Vitrification of eggs and embryos has become an increasingly common process. An In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) cycle generally produces several embryos to ensure that some are of sufficient quality to be transferred to the uterus and achieve a pregnancy. Typically, one or two high-quality embryos are selected for transfer, and if there are more viable embryos, these are frozen for future use, either for subsequent IVF attempts or to plan more children in the future.

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